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Why Sex Education In Schools Matter

Schools Play Key Role in HIV/STD Prevention

 

Why schools?

Just as schools are critical settings for preparing students academically, they are also vital partners in helping young people take responsibility for their own health. School health programs can help youth adopt lifelong attitudes and behaviors that support overall health and well-being—including behaviors that can reduce their risk for HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).

In the United States, schools have direct contact with more than 50 million students for at least 6 hours a day during 13 critical years of their social, physical, and intellectual development. After the family home, schools are the primary places responsible for the development of young people. This gives schools an opportunity to play an important role in HIV and STD prevention.

What can schools do to support HIV and STD prevention?

Photo: Teenage boy and girlResearch shows that well-designed, well-implemented HIV/STD prevention programs can significantly reduce sexual risk behaviors among youth. A review of 48 comprehensive curriculum-based sex and STD/HIV education programs found that about two-thirds of the HIV/STD prevention programs studied had a significant impact on reducing sexual risk behaviors,1-2 including

  • A delay in first sexual intercourse,
  • A decline in the number of sex partners, and
  • An increase in condom or contraceptive use.

None increased the likelihood of having sex.1-2

Schools also can conduct programs to teach youth how to solve problems, communicate with others, and plan for the future. Evidence indicates that such youth asset-development programs can be associated with longer-term reductions in sexual risk behaviors.3

What can schools do to support HIV and STD testing?

Making HIV testing* a routine part of health care for adolescents and adults aged 13–64 years is an important strategy recommended by CDC to reduce the spread of HIV.4 HIV testing is also an integral part of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy to prevent the spread of HIV and improve health outcomes for those who are already infected.5

State and local education agencies and schools are essential partners in this effort. Schools can help support HIV and STD testing by—

  • Teaching students about HIV and other STDs.
  • Promoting communication between parents and adolescents.
  • Teaching students how to find HIV counseling and testing services.
  • Providing referrals to testing, counseling, and treatment services.
  • Providing on-site testing for HIV and STDs.

CDC’s Division of Adolescent and School Health (DASH): Supporting HIV and STD Prevention Efforts

Sexual risk behaviors place adolescents at risk for HIV infection and other STDs:

  • In 2010, of the estimated 47,500 new HIV infections in the United States, 12,200 were among youths aged 13–24 years.6
  • Nearly half of the 19 million new STDs each year are among young people aged 15–24 years.7

DASH provides funding and other assistance that enables state and local education agencies to deliver HIV prevention programs that are scientifically sound and grounded in the latest research on effectiveness. Many of the strategies implemented by schools to prevent HIV infection can also help young people avoid other STDs and unintended pregnancy.

DASH-funded activities include—

  • Implementing HIV/STD prevention curricula that are medically accurate, are consistent with evidence of effectiveness, and teach critical skills such as how to access valid information about HIV and how to develop effective refusal and negotiation skills.
  • Helping communities collect and analyze data on sexual risk behaviors of young people to ensure that programs are data driven and responsive to local needs.
  • Providing state-of-the-art professional development to ensure that teachers have the knowledge and skills to effectively teach young people how to protect themselves from HIV/STD infection.
  • Ensuring safe and supportive school climates that increase student engagement with school, reduce discrimination, bullying, and isolation, and decrease the likelihood that students will engage in risky behaviors.
  • Supporting the adoption and implementation of critical policies related to infection control procedures and confidentiality for students and staff with HIV infection.
  • Establishing links to community-based health services that provide testing, counseling, and treatment for HIV and other STDs.

This article was from CDC. (http://www.cdc.gov/Features/HIVSTDPrevention/index.html?s_CID=tw_STD0130466)

 
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Posted by on March 27, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

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The Filipino Adolescents 2012

The Filipino Adolescents 2012.

 

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The Filipino Adolescents 2012

(Photo courtesy of http://reynthology.blogspot.com/2012/06/pinoy-teen-smokers-on-rise.html)

A woman recently gained attention after she performed cesarean section on her OWN SELF, delivering her own baby. As of this time we don’t know what drove her to do this. Did she use anesthesia, what kind and how, to avoid pain; or did she do it without any anesthetics at all? What drove her to do this when the baby is term and she could just have waited to labour? She sew herself with a regular needle and thread.

I remember another case of abortion that I came across with, though not as violent as that top story. She was in her early 20s, student. She was impregnated by her boyfriend; they’re unmarried. She looked frail, like someone who’s so meek enough to who raise her point when they’d argue. She seemed like she’ll say yes to everything.

At about 28 weeks, her boyfriend told her to take they need to do something about the pregnancy. They bought some abortifacient from the witches selling “pamparegla” (menstruation regulating substance/concoctions) outside Quiapo Church. (Yes, that iconic church that seems not to do anything about those witches around her, and allowing them to bastardize her with their merchandize, even on a Sunday). She took in 5 tablets of the drug, and inserted another 10 tablets into her vagina. Presto, preterm labor instantly.

She delivered to a 28 weeks preterm baby boy, who eventually needed mechanical ventilator to breath. They cannot afford surfactant so it was not given to the baby.

I talked to the mother of the baby as well as her mother about the incident.

First, I asked her why she committed that act. She blankly said, her boyfriend told her to do it.

Second, I asked her if she knew that taking the drug and inserting them as well to her vagina will cause labor pains, she just said “no.”

Then I told her, “are you aware that what you did is a form of killing?” She just said “no.”

My next question was “do you know that what you did is a crime?” Again, blankly, she said “no.”

Lastly, I told her, “did you know that I can call a police right now and have you arrested for what you did to your baby?” That was the only time she seemed to have realized the gravity of her crime, and so was her mother, and they broke down.

It is overwhelming and alarming that young people nowadays are not abreast with the different things they are doing. Only after the crime as been consummated will they come to realize that such an act was criminal.  What have you there… bullying classmates until the victim falls in a manhole and die, joking about holding/pointing a gun to a playmate and then accidentally shoot and kill him, daredevil stunts with a bike or skateboard just because they saw it was cool on youtube videos and then they get the worse fracture an orthopedics would almost object attending to, and many more.

Adolescence is a time of big confusion during a person’s life; they’re no longer kids, but they’re not yet adults. Hormones are raging making them ambivalent or confused, seeking identity or roles to portray, explore their sexuality, among other else. Peer influence is strong enough thus the high probability to form gangs during this age.

Parents have the biggest responsibility to guide their children until they can become totally independent and live on their own. It’s not the teachers at school, nor the religious at church. But how could the parents attend to all of their children’s needs when there are too many of them? Guidance and proper education can also fill in the void these adolescents quest.

A very matter of fact education that these teens need these days is age-appropriate sex education. This does not teach students to foreplay and have orgasm. Rather, sexuality education that will teach them about their body parts, how it functions, how pregnancy occurs, what are the sequela of being pregnant, responsible parenthood, contraceptives, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), etc. With the advent of information technology, a person can easily access these information, but without guidance, they will not understand it clearly. Still guidance is what these young people need so as to avoid unwanted “excursions.”

A study done has already shown that sexuality education has significantly delayed the first sexual intercourse among teenagers, lesser incidence of STIs, lesser incidence of early pregnancy and increased use of contraceptives.

Another sad facts that have plagued the young people recently are: (1) Philippines has been ranked no. 1 having the most number of teenage pregnancies in Asia, (2) increasing incidence since 1984 of HIV/AIDS among the 15-24 age bracket (2282/9669 or 23.6% cummulative incidence as of May 2012, http://www.doh.gov.ph/sites/default/files/NEC_HIV_May-AIDSreg2012.pdf), and (3) the very high incidence of smoking among the Filipino teenagers. These must have caught the attention of those in the palace.

Will you just be startled there?

 

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Early Marriages, Adolescents and Young Pregnancies

Early Marriages, Adolescents and Young Pregnancies.

 

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